School, weather and hospital trips 

I feel like so much happens on these placements that one or two blog posts just don’t do it justice. 
Last week we started our projects, going into schools and teaching English and Six Bricks (a Lego development program), visiting local crèches, and facilitating a youth homework club. At the moment it’s a weird mix of having so much to do, and moments where we have nothing. Trying to keep everyone motivated is proving difficult, but I know how frustrating it is to leave somewhere believing you haven’t done enough. It’s also a hard balance because I don’t want to overwork everyone, this program can be really tough and I don’t want to add to the stress. I’m really proud of how my team are dealing with it so far. It’s hard to adjust to a new culture (even for the SA volunteers), new work, and new people all at the same time, but they’re thriving and I firmly believe they’re going achieve some great things.
The weather here has been a bit insane, it went from one day at 40 degrees to the next at 17. One moment the sun will be beating down on us, the next it will be chucking it down with rain. It’s honestly as temperamental as in England, though perhaps a little more extreme. Unfortunately, it has meant there were a few schools we couldn’t get to last week due to the rain. This was frustrating but provided us with some good downtime and a chance for team bonding.

The community continues to be great support to us, particularly the team at Wellspring and Abbie, I honestly don’t know what I would do without them. I’m discovering that being a team leader can be a very isolating position to be in and so the support I receive is invaluable. As a team leader I’m often the messenger, yet the phrase ‘don’t shoot the messenger’ doesn’t seem to apply. However, I think that the team often need someone to shoot their arrows at, so for the moment at least, I’m happy to be that person, I just might need to prepare some better armour.

Complete chaos struck on Friday as one of our team members, Amy, became extremely ill and I had to accompany her to the hospital. Her fever was raging and she was in a lot of pain. We travelled to Pietermaritzburg (1 ½ hours away) where she was admitted (after waiting 7 hours!) for observation. We were relieved to discover that she didn’t need surgery but the diagnosis still wasn’t great. She was supposed be discharged today but the doctor is still concerned about a number of things and so we’re still without our beloved Amy. It most definitely is not the same without her here and we’re desperate for her return.

Prayer requests:

For Amy, that she recovers quickly and can return to us, and in the meantime not be too bored or isolated in hospital; that she knows she is loved and missed.

For motivation – to continue in our work even when it’s tempting to give up.

For friendships in the team, that we’ll all be able to support each other, particularly on the hard days.

For energy and peace of mind –this weekend has been particularly difficult and stressful and I think we could all do with boost.

 

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Khayelisha Week Four

It’s incredible to think that we have now been in South Africa for a month, so much has happened yet it’s passed so quickly.

This past week has been really incredible, we started off on Monday up at the bore hole investigating the water issue. To show us how deep the pipes went, Laurens (who works with Khayelisha) dropped a pebble down the hole and we were amazed to hear that there was a splash of water as it hit the bottom. We all kept our fingers crossed in the hopes that it was more than a puddle. After lowering the pipe and giving it a test we were so grateful to find water pouring out at the other end. This hole was completely dry just last week yet somehow God has answered our prayers and provided for the people here. There are still some issues regarding the water but we are encouraged to have gotten this far and we continue to pray for solutions.

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Tuesday saw the start of our life skills lessons on ‘Poverty’ and ‘Human Trafficking’. We were relieved to find that the students really listened to a lot of what was being said and reacted in a way that provided us hope. They weren’t easy subjects to teach, nor to listen to, yet we are glad to be given such important topics.

We were finally able to start on the solar ovens this week, which we have all been looking forward to. Our first job was to dust them down and give them three coats of paint, and with each coat taking a day to dry, this took a while to work on. We hope to finish twenty of them by the 28th May, so far we have eight, but we continue with determination, after all the sooner they’re finished the sooner we can test them out (yum).

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There was some excitement on Wednesday this week, as we greeted Debbie and Tracey, where we shared our progress and were able to hear about how the other teams were getting on. As much as we love being out in Tugela Ferry we are sad not to keep contact with the other volunteers, we are so excited to be reunited with them next week for the midterm review, it’ll be so good to hear everyone’s stories.

Prayer Requests

We pray that water issue continues to improve, so much has happened yet there is still much to overcome.

That we finish the solar ovens on time. It would be so great to deliver all twenty to the care workers.

That we arrive safely back in Durban, and we get the chance to reconnect with the other teams.

Our life skills lessons next week are on Children’s rights, something we are all passionate about so we also pray that these go well.

Khayelisha Week Two

This past week has been a real insight into the area of Tugela Ferry, where we are based. We’ve been working on a number of different projects and have spoken to a wide variety of people, all of whom have inspired us in multiple ways. We started the week off with work on the library, it wasn’t particularly hard work but it was time consuming and tedious. In attempt to make it more interesting we blasted the music and began filming for a video we intend to put together.

Most of our week has been spent in the school doing lesson cover for maths and science, as well as teaching our life skills sessions; time management for grade 8 and 9 (which is a bit of an unheard novelty in South Africa), and HIV/AIDS to grades 4,5,6, and 10. Nonto was definitely the hero of the hour in these lessons as she captivated each class she was in.

Unfortunately we haven’t had as much time as we would like at the Khayelisha project but we hope that this will change next week. We already find ourselves researching recipes we could experiment with in the solar ovens (that we are still to build). Our stomachs grumble at the thought.

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A challenge that most of us face is the language barrier. Zulu is a particularly difficult language to come to grips with, the clicks and rhythm that comes so easily to those here, have caused us westerners to stumble. It really is a musical language and we are envious of the chants we hear daily. However, we persevere; we attend lessons every Tuesday in an aim to better ourselves. Nonto and Katlego laugh as we practice (badly). Our favourite words (the ones we can remember) are amanzi (water), woza (come), and inlovu (elephant).

This past weekend has been fantastic, we had a chance to meet up with the Pastor of the mission church (which works alongside the school and Khayelisha) and discussed with him our ideas for the community. It was fascinating hearing how he has strived in the area, and we feel encouraged to pursue our passion to help in the area.

Sunday was our relaxation day, which we thoroughly enjoyed as we took the opportunity to have our first braai (bbq) down by the river.

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At times this week has been quite stressful, but we have found rewards in unlikely places and are excited to work with so many inspirational people.

Prayer Requests

Our life skills lessons next week consist of Human Trafficking, and Poverty, both of which are difficult subjects. It would be great if our message comes across strong and effective.

Our Zulu needs to improve (a lot).

We’re a passionate team with many ideas, we pray that we can focus on the right things for the community and ensure that our time is spent wisely.

The boys have now moved up to Hebron (the boys site), so we pray that we are still able to communicate with them, and we manage to find time to socialise with them as well as work. The water is still an issue, so again we hope that this is solved soon.

Sawubona from the Inner City Team!

Sawubona from the Inner City Team here in Durban! We’ve finally gotten round to writing a blog post about what’s been happening during our first couple of weeks on placement.

Our Team: Lucy, Katie, Sarah, Amanda, Nonhlanhla, Sebe and Karen (not pictured but we love her (she made us say that))
Our Team: Lucy, Katie, Sarah, Amanda, Nonhlanhla, Sebe and Karen (not pictured, but we love her (she made us say that))

After an awesome but intense week of orientation, we travelled to what would be our home for the next nine weeks. We arrived at a hostel called Hippo Hide, where we are all living together for our placement. We are so fortunate to be staying here; the facilities are great (we have a pool!.. Not that any of us have braved it yet. It’s freezing.) And the staff are so lovely and helpful. It’s also been great fun getting to know the other people coming through the hostel, including a group of Jo Burg cyclists who left us loads of food (YAY!).

Sunset view from our hostel.
Sunset view from our hostel.

Our first weekend together consisted of getting to know each other better, coming up with a food plan and going shopping, resting, having a movie night, going to Glenridge church (which we all love!) and laughing during a game of Frisbee and a picnic at the botanic gardens.

Due to xenophobic attacks on foreign nationals in the centre of Durban, we were unable to start our placement at the inner city crèches, but we have been working with a lovely crèche in a township called Chesterville. We started off doing manual gardening and painting work, but as our first week progressed we ended up doing more and more work directly with the kids (age 2-5) in their classes. The kids are amazing and we love them, but for the UK volunteers communicating well with the children has been a struggle, because they are all Zulu speaking. Thankfully this hasn’t been too much of an issue as our SA team members have been fantastic at translating! It’s been difficult for us to be thrown straight into support teaching, but it’s been great to see different gifts shine through our team. Early on in our first week, Sarah taught the kids ‘wind the bobbin up’ which has fast become a favourite! As well as helping out in classes at the crèche, we have still managed to progress with the manual work. We have done a lot of digging and weeding on the driveway, and have finished all the prep and priming on the metal containers near the jungle gym. They’re ready to paint now, as soon as we get our hands on all the bright colours!

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Action shot of musical bumps with the children.
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Clearing the driveway to the crèche.

Alongside our work at the crèche, we have been working with a great organisation called City Celebration which is fuelled by a vision to see kids come to know the love of Jesus through dance. Jade, Sindi and Margo are three very inspirational women who run the classes at schools, in and out of school hours with girls and boys between the ages of 6 and 17. It’s very clear how much the kids enjoy the classes and love the atmosphere that’s created there. As volunteers, our job is to support with the teaching and help keep the class in order – this is especially challenging in the larger classes (there can be up to 100 children!). To be honest, when we’re there it doesn’t really feel like work. Dancing with the kids is so fun, and they are so easy to love (most of the time). They are so full of energy and hugs so the City Celebration classes are a joy to be a part of. In our second week of placement Katie got the chance to help Jade teach around 100 girls some ballet, which she really enjoyed doing. As well as helping at the classes, in the coming weeks we may be helping Jade set up a website, child protection policy and behaviour and discipline policy which will be awesome.

City Celebration event.
City Celebration event.

As well as working hard on our placement sites and with the admin work back at the hostel, we have had a trip to the beach (ice cream was involved – oh yes!) and the zoo. Our first two weeks at the hostel have been tough – constantly being around one another has brought its challenges, especially when we come from different cultures and stages of life. But as we get to know each other, communicating and working as a team is getting easier and day by day our team times are filled with more laughter. On Monday we will get to find out when/if we start to work in the inner city crèches. The xenophobia situation seems to be improving so we are hopeful it will be soon! We have also found out that the crèche in Chesterville would like us to help them become a registered Early Childhood Development Centre (ECD). This is great and it means we can carry on working with them and hopefully help them take steps towards gaining sustainable funding. We don’t know what the rest of our placement will look like, but we are trusting that God has a plan for us in the city and that he will use us where we are needed.

Edit: Good news, as the violence has calmed down and the city centre is safe, tomorrow we will be starting our placement in the inner city crèches! We are all very excited but unsure what to expect. Our team will be splitting in to pairs (one SA and one UK). In our pairs we will be attending two crèches each twice a week. For all the crèches we are aiming to get them to government registered Early Childhood Development (ECD) status but they are all at different stages in this journey.

Uthando oluningi (lots of love),

Katie, Lucy and the rest of our team!

Some things to pray for:

  • Unfortunately Sarah has been ill for the past week so it would be lovely if you could pray for her speedy recovery.
  • That any anxieties about the rest of our placement would disappear as we trust in God.
  • That we can continue to learn from each other and grow closer together.
  • Karen and Lucy have been involved in meetings with churches about a response to the xenophobia. It would be awesome if you could pray for a way as a whole team that we could help the refugees and support the churches’ response to the xenophobia.
  • Nonhlanhla is sitting exams in the next couple of weeks, prayers that they go well as she has been studying extremely hard.
  •  That we settle in quickly to our new crèches and make up lost time.

The first week at Khayelisha

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During orientation we were introduced to our new team members, ours consisting of three UK volunteers, myself (Fiona), Patrick (our team leader), and Matt, and the two South African volunteers, Nontobeko and Katlego. Although none of us knew each other before the week began, we were starting to feel more of a team as we headed off to Tugela Ferry. The knowledge that you’ll be living with a group of people for eight weeks automatically breaks down a lot of walls.

Within the first couple of days we took the time to explore the area and meet those that manage and run the Khayelisha project. We discussed the work we would be doing, from schools to chicken coops, and became acquainted with our new accommodation. Being in such a remote area can have its disadvantages, but as we absorbed our surroundings these issues became trivial. We are situated in the heart of a valley, mountains filling our landscapes, rivers flowing beside us and the sun lighting us up. Each time we look out our windows we are blown away by the views.

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Meeting the kids has been one of our favourite experiences so far. The boys bonded immediately through the wonders of football (known here as soccer), and myself and Nonto provided the calmer experience, appreciated by the few that were less energetic.

Already we’ve been facing a lot of challenges, having been thrown in the deep end at the local school. Despite our lack of teaching experience we have all been asked to lead some classes in the absence of five teachers, the subjects of which some of us don’t understand. Another is the library, which has descended into chaos with the latest donation of books.

As our days progress we are finding more and more things that need to be done but we are excited to be keeping busy. We hope to leave in eight weeks having made a difference to those that reside here.  

Prayer requests

The boys centre currently has no water, at the moment they have to buy packaged water, which is an expense they can’t afford so we pray that this is solved soon.

There is a massive issue with gender inequality here and something that we are becoming increasingly passionate about. If we could effect change within just a few of the young people then that would be an incredible thing.

Next week we will be starting the first, of many, of our life skill sessions at the school, we pray that these will be a success and that our messages come across strong.